CocoRosie - Heartache City - Albums - Reviews - Soundblab

CocoRosie - Heartache City

by paul_guyet Rating:8 Release Date:2015-10-16

CocoRosie have always unsettled me. Something about their ghostly, oddly childlike vocals and instrumentation combined with their dreamlike lyrics makes me think of them, not as singers, but rather as kidnap/murder victims returning from the grave to lead those interested and keyed in to the lair of their killer. For the first time ever, while listening to their sixth album, Heartache City, I did not feel that way. The duo, made up of sisters, Bianca ("Coco") and Sierra ("Rosie") Casady, still have their trademark sound, lyrically, vocally, and musically, but something about this album feels less haunted and more wistful. The entire work sounds like two little girls recalling memories; not all good ones, but real. Faded, and real.

The free flowing, stream of consciousness poetry of "Forget Me Not" (which could be a cover off Damon Albarn's solo debut), "Lost Girls" (a tragic doo-wop tale about hitchhiking), and "Tim and Tina" (carrying on the girls' tradition of butterfly imagery) give the album the feel of a teenager's diary, with all of the weird art and awkward honesty one would expect. One could almost dance to the limping recollections of "Un Beso", but you'd probably be distracted by the lyrics. The quiet and soothing, vaguely church-like harmony and drift of "No One Knows She Goes There" gently sends the listener on their way, wondering whatever did happen to those two Casady girls...

Heartache City feels tiny, unique, and intricately beautiful, like some custom-made music box you might hear only on the album itself. The sisters remain two of the most singular performers creating music today and should be experienced by anyone bored with the norm or searching for something they've never heard before.

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