Bunny & The Invalid Singers - The Invalid Singers

by Jeff Penczak Rating:8 Release Date:2015-06-19

Glaswegian musician/artist Bunny has traded in his Electric Horseman for Invalid Singers on his sophomore effort, but the premise is essentially the same: electronic, glitchy, anarchic cacophony marrying the abrasive industrialization of Faust or Einsturzende Neubauten with catchy tunes from the Depeche Mode School of Dance. But just when you thought it safe to head out onto the dancefloor, he pulls the rug out from under you and morphs into delicate library music like the groovy soundtrack efforts of Fitness Forever or Giorgio Tuma. And that’s just opener ‘Ask the Man Inside Your Head’.

So sit back and drift off to dreamland with the gorgeously sentimental floater ‘Gift to Gift’ and relive all those romantic 70s Italian soundtracks, courtesy Morricone, Umiliani, and Piccioni. And while ‘The Unravelling of Sarah Wallace’ sounds like a cheezy soft-core porno flick, the bubbly 'theme song' features some blistering fuzz guitar solos and bubbly synths to help you imagine the images.

If sexy, wordless female vocals are you thing (and why wouldn’t they be?), wrap yourself ‘Into China Arms’ or try one of the two versions of the (lyricked) title track (in Japanese from Asuka Tanaka and English courtesy Trixie Delight). The soft-core soundtrack world is, er, overflowing with sweeping, elegant romantic suites and Bunny slips right into the groove with sexy, hesitant bursts of synthy swashes on such titillating titles as ‘Annie & the Station Orchestra’ and ‘The Putty Legs of Dusty McGuire’, which just begged to be dramatised in a trench coat theatre on that other side of town.

So pack a bag lunch, grab some popcorn and choc-ies, and settle in for a satisfying evening of dreamy film music, punctuated by the odd pneumatic drill to the back of the skull just to keep you from drifting off into la-la land. And while you’re at it, have fun determining whether Bunny’s 'singers' are a) Asuka and Trixie; b) unacceptable; c) suffer from some debilitating malady; d) all of the above; or e) none of the above – he’s just having us on!

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