Bastille - Bad Blood - Albums - Reviews - Soundblab

Bastille - Bad Blood

by Greg Spencer Rating:7.5 Release Date:2013-03-04

Bastille are growing and growing in terms of popularity, and quickly. After performing at Reading and Leeds last year, they've seen their stock go through the roof, with their debut album hitting number one in the UK and the group rising above the pit of indie obscurity. Yet it's hard to grasp what sort of audience Bastille are aiming at. There's plenty of substance to this record and a real maturity to the tone and style, yet something remains amiss, although opening track 'Pompeii' certainly packs a punch. It rumbles along with a real fire in its heart, and importantly has an epic and catchy chorus which will undoubtedly capture the hearts of not only indie fans but a mainstream pop crowd too.

There's real inventiveness and imagination at play on Bad Blood. The title track serves up a slow tempo and intoxicating sense of real talent from Dan Smith and co. 'The Weight of Living, Part II' adds real vibrancy to the record. It's an optimistic and exquisite song which could really help you get in the mood for summer.

It's on some of the slower tracks that Bastille fail to engage fully. 'Things We Lost in the Fire' is a track which lacks any real dynamism or vitality. It sounds like a b-side, and not something which would be track two on your debut album.

Other tracks like 'Daniel in the Den' and 'Flaws' actually verge on the irritating due to the all too cosy nature of them. There's not enough threat or potency. It's the sort of stuff Ed Sheeran fans will lap up basically. However, Dan Smith shows his fantastic vocal range on 'Oblivion', and the song works because of his great voice. It's a song of real emotional resonance.

Overall, it's a really solid debut album from a band who will grow even stronger over the coming years. For now, they've released a really interesting and diverse selection of songs which are worth hearing if you don't really want to hear anymore 'Gangnam Style'.

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