Ty Segall - Twins

by Steve Reynolds Rating:9.5 Release Date:2012-10-08

Ty Segall specialises in short sharp garage rock ditties, beautifully swathed in lo-fi and fuzz. He leaps back into the spotlight with his new ironic long player the distinctly cuddly 'Twins'. Ironic in the fact that his songs are to be precise, a master of brevity. Ty is a martyr to his musical genre and having churned out multitudes of guitar abuse over the last few years he still manages to maintain a steady high watermark of quality.

The songs on 'Twins' clock in from around 2 minutes with the majority taking little more than 3 but what they lack in time they merely make up for in delivery. Take into account the driving 'Would you be my love' accompanied by a solo a certain Mr J Mascis would be proud off, Segall's heightened falsetto hits the nail on the head perfectly and it's all tied in a quite breath-taking 140 odd seconds.

'Ghost' bucks the rapid trend as it's a pot of rasping droning guitar and rounded up with some pretty primitive drum patterns and Segal's delivery is staple slacker territory, all beautifully wrapped up in a twisted piece of solo work.

'They told me too' is patched together by the feedback of Hendrix, the vocal of Wayne Coyne and the drive that was so important in early years of Buffalo Tom. At times you can't fail to start head banging along to the incessant bastard guitar solos. Segall is not trying to be clever with 'Twins' but you get is the feeling that he is distinctly visceral, playing from the gut but with a heart.

'Handglams' is a soarer. A clever slice of noise pop, full of humour, bounce and mellifluous to the end. 'Who are you?' is pretty redolent on the big hitters of the60s: the melodies and hooks of the Beatles juxtaposed with the aggression and RnB (yes, real RnB) of The Who curtailed by Segal lazily sneering "that's it"

This is an accomplished album delivered with a confident aplomb of a man mining a rich vein of creativity and should you wish to take it onboard then resistance is simply futile. A golden gem perfect for the long cold winter ahead.

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