Kendra Amalie - Intuition - Albums - Reviews - Soundblab

Kendra Amalie - Intuition

by Bill Golembeski Rating:9 Release Date:2019-09-06
Kendra Amalie - Intuition
Kendra Amalie - Intuition

Intuition is a beautiful psych-rock self-portrait. This music paints with color. It’s a wonderous sonic ride into the moment when acoustic sounds blend seamlessly into a cosmic pulse.

Walt Whitman wrote, “I believe a leaf of grass is no less than the journey work of the stars.”

This album is both “a leaf of grass” and “the journey work of the stars.”

The first song, “Breathe Underwater,” has a tight tense guitar that scuffs against Kendra’s urgent vocal. Quite frankly, it echoes the absolute arty rock and roll of (the great) Kate Bush, circa “The Ninth Wave” on her Hounds of Love album. It also pumps like a Peter Gabriel track, when he made dangerously melodic music. It is classic single material that will probably never be a classic single. More’s the shame. This is a taught piece of arty (yet quite catchy) rock music.

And, speaking of Sir David Gilmore (who, besides guitaring for Pink Floyd, assisted the young Kate Bush with demos), the next instrumental, “Boat Ride II,” certainly has his signature piercing comet guitar sound that carries a relaxed bit of dust and gases, that eventually blurts a big burst of noise. The next song, “Facets of a Holy Diamond,” continues with the languid Floyd sound. This is acid folk-rock with a dreamy vocal and a tough guitar rustling in the background. There’s a really nice Eastern vibe that locks into the synapses of the brain.

Lovers of German space rock that dabbles in ethnic-fusion will find a lot to love here. Bands like Agitation Free, Amon Duul, and Embryo come to mind. This stuff buzzes the brain. What sounds like a Tibetan horn (and is an oboe!) ends “Holy Diamond” and ushers in “Patternmaker,” the twelve-string guitar instrumental (with bass and drum) that does, indeed, melt the soul to the universe. And that Tibetan horn returns, like a soul from anyone’s Book of the Dead to guide the song into the sunset.

The next three songs act as a trilogy of sorts. “Stay Low” is twelve string heaven with vocals and a steel guitar that bend the tune into an Earthly orbit. Again, this is eerie folk that’s deep forest spooky stuff. It recalls the chilly timber of the great band Comus. The vocal dances with ghosts, while a steel pedal guitar dances over the haunted melody.

The instrumental “Crop Circle,” links two vocal pieces. Kendra plays her signature twelve-string guitar as it brushes against weird electronic sounds.

“Become the Light” is, again, Pink Floyd languid with a Kate Bush like vocal that calls from a dark wood, which then yields to a tantalizing guitar solo that simply erupts into noisy joy, which, well, is noisy enough to startle the quietude of the starry night, or for that matter, illuminate the dank darkness of a cave with ancient images painted on its wall. Yeah, it’s that kind of record.

Ah, “Improvisation for Mark Hollis” is a twelve-string fractured instrumental, not unlike a solo bit by (the great) Ralph Towner or (the equally great) Michael Chapman. The tune pays homage to Talk Talk’s sadly deceased main player for the oddly wonderful albums, Spirit of Eden and Laughing Stock.

It all ends with an electronic sound poem, “Look at the Light (Source).” But the guitars tag the tune to an Earthy leaf of grass, while the rumblings of the song sing to “the journey work of the stars.” Waterfalls and thunder are added, and then a singular acoustic guitar pulls the song into Earthly blues, while that thunder persists. You know, symbolism never escapes the perceptive soul. And, according to Kendra, this song is about “the possible experience of transforming from life to death to afterlife.” Yeah (again). It’s that kind of record.

This is an album of tough rock. It’s an album of acoustic music, and sometimes, it’s music that floats with electric magic carpet ride grooves.

So, let’s all pick a pumpkin and then beg off dead souls. This album does that. This is new music that rocks the old soul, yet cons a living genie out of the ancient bottle to sing and dance in the grooves of a pretty great record.

Comments (0)

There are no comments posted here yet
Related Articles
Kendra Amalie - Intuition - Albums - Reviews - Soundblab
Galaverna - Dodsdans
  • 08/16/2019
  • By Bill Golembeski
Kendra Amalie - Intuition - Albums - Reviews - Soundblab
Kazyak - Odyssey
  • 08/08/2019
  • By Bill Golembeski
Kendra Amalie - Intuition - Albums - Reviews - Soundblab
MOHIT - Yoghurt
  • 07/05/2019
  • By Bill Golembeski