Tangerine Dream - The Official Bootleg Series Volume Three - Albums - Reviews - Soundblab

Tangerine Dream - The Official Bootleg Series Volume Three

by Rob Taylor Rating:10 Release Date:2019-05-31
Tangerine Dream - The Official Bootleg Series Volume Three
Tangerine Dream - The Official Bootleg Series Volume Three

The hypnotic sweep of ‘White Eagle’ is transportive, a beautiful night lullaby reflective of the introspective phase of Tangerine Dream’s early 80s output. The third volume of Esoteric’s Series of Official Bootlegs of live recordings is a very special one for me, because believe it or not, I was at the concert in Sydney. A mesmeric experience and one I had not anticipated, being dragged begrudgingly by an over-zealous, but attractive German exchange student. I didn’t expect to like the concert because at the time I was engaged wholeheartedly with Heaven 17, New Order and The Smiths. I’m probably being revisionist but I seem to recall being overcome by the profundity of the evening.

The Sydney concert reproduced here is not the one of legend, as with the 1977 Detroit Concert also included in the box, but it is fascinating because I also saw Ultravox at the State Theatre in Sydney the same year, and there are some parallels, especially considering the Conny Plank studio connection. Whereas though, Ultravox were ambassadors of the new wave and breaking ground commercially, Tangerine Dream were classicists first and foremost, not interested in the pithy confections of the singles charts. Nor did they have a charismatic singer like Midge Ure. In fact, they rarely experimented with singers at all. Much of the sound of the 1982 material though is similar, even if Ultravox were not so exquisitely layered. Tangerine Dream were architects of the long form sound picture. Others dabbled but ultimately Tangerine Dream was more forerunner to the type of music we now associate with the label, Bureau B.

The 1977 Detroit concert is brilliant. The sound is pre-noise suppression and has audible tape hiss but the dynamics are remarkably intact. The sense of excitement is palpable. The Moog and Mellotron produce a heady atmosphere, and there’s some extraordinary guitar playing from Froese. The concert reached 125db at one point with electronic sequencers, percussion and guitar staging a shoot-out.

Despite what I remembered to be some inscrutably abstract sounds when I was at the concert, my middle-aged ears have worn well. The music on these concerts shows a pre-eminence only afforded the worthiest pioneers of artistic endeavour.

Comments (0)

There are no comments posted here yet
Related Articles
Tangerine Dream - The Official Bootleg Series Volume Three - Albums - Reviews - Soundblab
Bitchin Bajas - Bajas Fresh
  • 11/07/2017
  • By Ljubinko Zivkovic