Faye Webster - Atlanta Millionaires Club - Albums - Reviews - Soundblab

Faye Webster - Atlanta Millionaires Club

by Nathan Fidler Rating:6 Release Date:2019-05-24
Faye Webster - Atlanta Millionaires Club
Faye Webster - Atlanta Millionaires Club

It’s been a six-year arc, and with two distinctly different albums under her belt, Faye Webster is swinging for a third, totally different one on Atlanta Millionaires Club. Growing away from her rootsy acoustic foundations, this plays out like a weird dream in a botanical garden.

“Even my tears have gone room temperature”, Webster sings on ‘Room Temperature’, a weirdly shoehorned rhyme which sets this album up for its strange mood. Where her previous album had relatable emotions and words, the emotions seem just out of reach and hazily personal in a way which feels exclusive.

Only on ‘What Used To Be Mine’ is there anything close to her original sound of guitar, slow, brushed drums and steel pedal guitar. It’s an island of a song which sticks out like a sore thumb compared with the rest of the tracks. ‘Flowers (Feat. Father)’ shows the greatest distance travelled musically for Webster, with Father chiming in a sleepy rap that seems to share no discernable shared theme with what comes before it.

It’s not like all the guitar has gone, far from it. Tracks like ‘Hurts Me Too’ and ‘Right Side Of My Neck’ show the same hallmarks, but with a tinge of soul creeping in. ‘Pigeon’ however, has to be by far the oddest sound. It begins melodically enough but hits a groove which doesn’t really seem to suit Webster’s voice. She’s clearing flexing her enjoyment of R&B, with smooth bass and short, raspy horns, but those things don’t fit right with the acoustic guitar and steel pedal guitar.

Where the two things mix best for her though, is on the infectious ‘Kingston’, allowing dreamy acoustic guitars to sit alongside soulful guitar gulps and quick, satisfying saxophone blasts. ‘Jonny’ takes the mood right down, drawing out verses with pretty poor lyrics only to hit it out of the park with the chorus line “This wasn’t supposed to be a love song, but I guess it is now”. The reprise of this track is also a welcome one at the end, as Faye speaks over the mournful violins and horns, bidding “Jonny” goodbye.

There’s less pep on this album than her previous two efforts, and all the movement is a steady swing. A lot of what she’s trying is admirable, clearly not satisfied to play the same kind of song over and over, but some it lands awkwardly and catches you so off-guard that it feels like songs get ruined by an overbearingly creepy tone. Pick through the points where it meshes well, however, and you’ll be well rewarded.

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I appreciate your perspective, but I heard something totally different with this album. I was impressed with the new album's slight departure because it was authentic and true. The pedal steel was haunting and gorgeous throughout, as well as her...

I appreciate your perspective, but I heard something totally different with this album. I was impressed with the new album's slight departure because it was authentic and true. The pedal steel was haunting and gorgeous throughout, as well as her soothing vocals. Your words are food for thought.

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