Deer Tick - Mayonnaise - Albums - Reviews - Soundblab

Deer Tick - Mayonnaise

by Nathan Fidler Rating:6 Release Date:2019-02-01
Deer Tick - Mayonnaise
Deer Tick - Mayonnaise

It’s unsurprising that Deer Tick haven’t yet made a name for themselves this side of the pond yet; there’s a limited niche for alternative-Americana here. With Mayonnaise, they release their sixth album and take another shot crafting an album to outlive them by putting out a compilation of covers and some alternatives of their songs (mainly from 2017’s Deer Tick Vol. 1 and Deer Tick Vol 2).

That’s surely the aim of every Americana band, to create a body of work, but also to make that classic timeless, played decades after it was released. On The Black Dirt Sessions in 2010, they seemed to find a surer footing for their sound. But this album feels like it has a greater sense of joy by combining their best bits and crafting different versions.

‘Hey! Yeah!’ - a newly written song - applies some country stylings, from the shimmy of the lyrics to the bucking bassline, you can imagine line dancing and hats held aloft. “I can think of nothing that ever seemed to keep you down”, it’s a positive message for John McCauley, who only on their last, full album was exploring some of the more painful elements of his life.

That’s not to say there isn’t that classic sense of slow, sombre tunes to be found though. ‘Too Sensitive For This World’, a cover, is a melancholy number which softly seems to revel in a man’s sensitive side and McCauley suits it well. Other covers include ‘Pale Blue Eyes’ by The Velvet Underground and ‘Run of the Mill’ by George Harrison, the latter sticking out like a strange, sore thumb in what is an otherwise smoothly put together collection.

‘Memphis Chair’, a beautiful instrumental, appears to be an original. It features a subtle saxophone alongside lounge piano and forlorn guitar, waltzing together around the room. It begs for a vocal tune but is all the more powerful for not having one.

Here the band give a good account of themselves, showing their eclectic taste in covers, the mind to revisit songs and try to improve upon them, but importantly they also show that they’re still in the game to write original songs - hopefully this is not so much a swansong, but more of a rebirth for another crack at that long-lasting, memorable album.

It’s unsurprising that Deer Tick haven’t yet made a name for themselves this side of the pond yet; there’s a limited niche for alternative-americana here. With Mayonnaise, they release their sixth album and take another shot crafting an album to outlive them by putting out a compilation of alternatives of their songs (mainly from 2017’s Deer Tick Vol. 1 and Deer Tick Vol 2).

That’s surely the aim of every Americana band, to create a body of work, but also to make that classic timeless, played decades after it was released. On The Black Dirt Sessions in 2010 they seemed to find a surer footing for their sound. But this album feels like it has a greater sense of joy by combining their best bits and crafting different versions.

‘Hey! Yeah!’ - the one newly written song - applies some country stylings, from the shimmy of the lyrics to the bucking bassline, you can imagine line dancing and hats held aloft. “I can think of nothing that ever seemed to keep you down”, it’s a positive message for John McCauley, who only on their last, full album was exploring some of the more painful elements of his life.

That’s not to say there isn’t that classic sense of slow, sombre tunes to be found though. ‘Too Sensitive For This World’, a cover, is a melancholy number which softly seems to revel in a man’s sensitive side and McCauley suits it well. Other covers include ‘Pale Blue Eyes’ by Velvet Underground and ‘Run of the Mill’ by George Harrison, the latter sticking out like a strange, sore thumb in what is an otherwise smoothly put together collection.

‘Memphis Chair’, a beautiful instrumental, appears to be an original. It features a subtle saxophone alongside lounge piano and forlorn guitar, waltzing together around the room. It begs for a vocal tune but is all the more powerful for not having one.

Here the band give a good account of themselves, showing their eclectic taste in covers, the mind to revisit songs and try to improve upon them, but importantly they also show that they’re still in the game to write original songs - hopefully this is not so much a swansong, but more of a rebirth for another crack at that long lasting, memorable album.

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