Gonjasufi - Callus

by Rob Taylor Rating:5 Release Date:2016-08-19

In a world full of contradictory morality, widening social, economic and cultural gulfs, and political mediocrity, there’s plenty to feel down about if you’re the dwelling kind. Of course, any thinking person is going to feel impacted by humanity’s more self-destructive traits, and everyone is entitled to be a commentator, and because of social media, a lot of people are.

Gonjasufi’s reductionist musical essays of societal woes, Callus, is prescriptive to say the least. He doesn’t hold back on the subjects of corporate slavery, political malfeasance and religious hypocrisy, and I suppose to that end, you might share his company. Subjecting your friends and acquaintances, however, to long monologues about how damned the human race is becoming is a bit of a bummer, and I prefer not to drink alone. The beauty, or at least the ruse of art, is that it can be recorded for posterity, and then people can choose to appreciate its representation of the world’s problems, or not, as the case may be.

Whether a kinship can be established will lie in the ability of the commentator to show a way out of the quagmire. Unless of course, you prefer an apocalyptic vision, like Gonjasufi.  Strangely, for a guy who does a lot of yoga, he seems predisposed by turmoil.

Gonjasufi’s Callus insinuates a terminal prognosis. Fifty minutes of industrial-edged  music featuring his trademark fractious psych-dub, and vocals that are sometimes indiscernible, processed in the manner of Mark Linkous’s Sparklehorse. Deep bass suffused with doom, and some oddball eastern string textures. Callus is a pretty difficult listen, even leaving aside the scaremongering lectures. Subterranean psychedelia with doom metal sensibilities. I suppose that’s the point. The intention was to create an oppressive canvas, and he succeeded. Unfortunately the mood is unrelenting and there's no carthartic gesture in sight.

 

 

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