An Idea For A Fireworks Display: An Introduction to Tom Waits

by Kevin Orton
Comments (2)

There's no mistaking that voice. Like Cash or Dylan, one note and you know just who it is. While his rusty pipes are an acquired taste, the initiated know he's one of America's greatest living songwriters. And as it turns out, none too shabby a film actor. In the 1970's he fell into self-parody but then dramatically reinvented himself with the 1983 masterpiece, Swordfishtombones. A bizarre hybrid of Leadbelly, Captain Beefheart, and Kurt Weill. Not to mention, his own unique brand of Blue Ruin. Here's all the Grim Reapers and Grand Weepers ranked. Click an album below to read a review

Comments (2)

This comment was minimized by the moderator on the site

Totally agree with your top 2. Swordfishtrombones was such a musical game changer. I'd probably move Mule Variations and my first introduction, Blue Valentine, up a bit. Think we will hear from him again?

This comment was minimized by the moderator on the site

Thanks Mark! Swordfish and Rain Dogs were my introduction and they just blew my mind. I wore Mule Variations out. Just love that record. And I think Blue Valentines is stunning. Rankings are kind of silly to me because I don't really have...

Thanks Mark! Swordfish and Rain Dogs were my introduction and they just blew my mind. I wore Mule Variations out. Just love that record. And I think Blue Valentines is stunning. Rankings are kind of silly to me because I don't really have favorites, it all depends on my mood. That said, Foreign Affairs has always left me cold and Nighthawks strikes me as a rather painful exercise in self-parody. He seems to release an album every 7 years, so I think we'll be hearing from him soon. At least I hope so!

Read More
There are no comments posted here yet