The Olivia Tremor Control - Music From the Unrealized Film Script: Dusk At Cubist Castle
The Olivia Tremor Control - Music From the Unrealized Film Script: Dusk At Cubist Castle

The Olivia Tremor Control - Music From the Unrealized Film Script: Dusk At Cubist Castle

As a fan of the Olivia Tremor Control, most fit under two modes of thought: those who believe that Dusk At Cubist Castle is their best work; and those who believe Black Foliage: Animation Music is their best work. Neither side is wrong; both works are perfect for very different reasons. The Olivia Tremor Control existed only for a moment it seems – eight short years that only saw two proper albums released, but a slew of EPs, singles, and compilations. It’s a shame because their two proper albums are bold game changers for indie rock in the 90s.

Tim Sentz
Yes - Close To The Edge
Yes - Close To The Edge

Yes - Close To The Edge

Florian Meissner
XTC - English Settlement
XTC - English Settlement

XTC - English Settlement

Bill Golembeski
George Harrison - All Things Must Pass
George Harrison - All Things Must Pass

George Harrison - All Things Must Pass

As I sat down to try and write something enlightening about a 48 year old album generally regarded as one of the best ever, I had to wonder, how many people reading this review actually lived through Beatlemania? I firmly believe that if you didn’t, you can listen to all the music, read all the books, and watch all the old Youtube videos, but you will never fully appreciate or understand the phenomenon that it was.

Howard scott
David Bowie - "Heroes"
David Bowie - "Heroes"

David Bowie - "Heroes"

Unrepentant Bowie geek here. So, if this is a bit long, I make no apology. Safe to say, Bowie is my favorite recording artist of all time. I say “is”, because he’s not dead to me. His legacy is far too alive for any of that death nonsense. In terms of his classic 70’s albums, I don’t play favorites. I adore them all. I keep coming back to them and each time I do, I discover something new. 1977’s ‘Heroes’ is no exception.  

Kevin Orton
The Cardigans - First Band On The Moon
The Cardigans - First Band On The Moon

The Cardigans - First Band On The Moon

When The Cardigans’ infectious brand of indie-fied lounge-pop caught commercial fire in the Fall of 1996 via the irresistibly infectious hit “Lovefool”, fans who flocked to stores to purchase the band’s third album First Band On The Moon (as opposed to the soundtrack for Baz Luhrmann's DiCaprio-led Romeo & Juliet) quickly discovered that the album's genius first single was merely the tip of a much larger iceberg.

Portishead - Dummy

There are few debuts as fully realized as that of Portishead’s 1994 release, Dummy. With an unflinching adherence to a jarring, introspective aesthetic, the potency of the album is no less muted by the passage of time, as Dummy remains as indefinable now as it did then. It’s not necessarily a ‘90’s’ album, but it is clearly one of that decade’s most important releases.

Deerhunter - Microcastle/Weird Era Cont.
Deerhunter - Microcastle/Weird Era Cont.

Deerhunter - Microcastle/Weird Era Cont.

A coworker of mine once approached my cubicle – this was a while back – and held up a copy of the Nine Inch Nail’s Pretty Hate Machine and uttered the line “Sometimes it’s just a Pretty Hate Machine day.” We shared a laugh, and it became apparent that her day was filled with frustration, and the only aphrodisiac was Trent Reznor’s most volatile work. This stuck with me for quite some time, and for her anniversary a few years later I presented her with the only album that I went to when I was feeling frustrated – Microcastle which to this day is still packaged with its companion piece Weird Era Cont.

Tim Sentz
Mazzy Star - So Tonight That I Might See
Mazzy Star - So Tonight That I Might See

Mazzy Star - So Tonight That I Might See

Some albums, great and forgotten, are cut from the blood of hardships, some from the sweat of non-stop touring, some from the tears of break-ups and disappointments; and then there are those cut straight from the bands own pure talents, refined, polished and left to shine in refracted light off their glorious surfaces. Miners dig for stones to uncover and cutters in workshops sculpt to shape rocks into shining jewels. Occasionally works of pure art are born.

Warwick Stubbs
X-Ray Spex - Germfree Adolescents
X-Ray Spex - Germfree Adolescents

X-Ray Spex - Germfree Adolescents

It’s been 40 years since ‘The World Turned Day-Glo’ and Poly Styrene & Co. sliced through the ‘Art-I-Ficial’ world of consumerism. Germfree Adolescents is a brutally honest broadside against ‘Genetic Engineering’, poseurs, ‘Warriors in Woolworths’, bandwagon-jumpers searching for their ‘Identity’ in the weeklies and fashion magazines, frustrated about living on the dole because ‘I Can’t Do Anything’.

Jeff Penczak
A Tribe Called Quest - The Low End Theory
A Tribe Called Quest - The Low End Theory

A Tribe Called Quest - The Low End Theory

Like the other Native Tongues acts, A Tribe Called Quest made a name for themselves by blurring genre lines and even artistic media in order to create a diverse, flourishing ecosystem of aesthetic variance. They began to gain a devoted following with their moderately successful debut, 1990’s People's Instinctive Travels and the Paths of Rhythm, which found the group preaching the gospel of positivity through Afrocentric lyrics and spitting witty verses over a minimalist jazz groove. Their signature sound was built around an efficient production that worked as a cultural bridge between generations.

Pink Floyd - Dark Side of the Moon
Pink Floyd - Dark Side of the Moon

Pink Floyd - Dark Side of the Moon

What’s there to say? Dark Side of the Moon is to classic rock what In The Aeroplane Over the Sea is to Indie: ubiquitous. Essential, but still ubiquitous all the same. It exists in the same pop culture sphere as Sgt. Pepper’s Lonely Hearts Club Band and Nevermind. Everything’s already been said about it by pretty much every publication on the face of the earth. In order to have any new insights at this point, you would had to have either been at the Abbey Road studio while it was being recorded or caught Roger Waters one too many drinks in at a local pub.

Kyle Kersey